The Importance of Adaptability in the Industrial Robotics Sector

Automation systems are predicted to account for 25% of capital spending in the industrial sector within the next five years, with CPG and logistics and fulfillment predicted to spend the most. At the same time, the automotive sector is staring down the barrel of EVs and how they will affect automated manufacturing, and e-commerce is increasing the demand for mobile robots.

There’s a lot going on in industrial robotics. We’re seeing automation spread across all sectors of industry, with the most common applications of automation technology being palletizing, material handling, counting, and sorting. And with the advent of mobile robots, we’re also seeing the possible applications of robotics proliferate.

With this new automation technology evermore available and constantly developing, the major obstacle that arises is actually implementing this new technology. While new manufacturing facilities may be able to start from scratch, existing companies need innovative, flexible and adaptive implementation of robotic automation to truly unlock their potential.

Automation Helps Manufacturers Work Around Labor Obstacles

Manufacturers today face logistical hurdles to overcome when it comes to human labor. It’s widely acknowledged there is higher demand than supply of human capital. Couple this shortage with the inherent problems and inconsistency that come with human error – especially in repetitive tasks – and it’s easy to see why automation is the best solution.

4D machine vision technology has revolutionized the field of industrial robotics, offering automated options for processes like counting, palletizing and identifying surface defects like porosity in metals manufacturing. As well, AI software that focused on machine response has made collaborative and mobile robots much more adaptable and flexible, making that theory of how useful robotic automation could be into an applicable reality.

Automation Companies Help Manufacturers Overcome Robot Obstacles

Just as there are human labor obstacles to navigate when adopting robotic systems, manufacturers also face automated labor obstacles at the front end of the process: implementation. Humans need to be even more adaptable than the robots they use; the perception of change is a significant pitfall when it comes to a company’s decision on whether or not to utilize robot automation systems.

There’s another facet to that adaptability, though, and it needs to happen on the part of the control system integrator. Robotics automation companies need to understand the unique goals of each manufacturer and design an integrated control system that fits into the operational culture of that company. This requires experienced, creative engineers that involve people every step of the way – from initial assessment to turnkey implementation, training and ongoing support.

The relationship between manufacturing client and system integrator is all-important when it comes to adopting automated systems and integrating robots with their human resources. Since this perceptual and physical reorganization is such a bottleneck to the expansion of robotic automation, partnering with a system integrator known for their effective, leading-edge automation services is key to riding the front of the robotics wave.

Cybersecurity is Key to Successful Robotics Implementation

While the shift to digital has already brought IT to the forefront of operational security in the industrial sector, the shift to automation has compounded its importance. IIoT and robots need to be integrated on a network as well as a cloud, and this leaves companies susceptible to system failures caused by bad actors.

These are hazards that can be circumvented with a threefold approach to IT management for robotics automation: thorough risk assessments, advanced cybersecurity measures, and redundant system integration that ensures the operator is always aware of the status of their system.

Manufacturers need to partner with automation firms known for their specialized IT/OT engineers and adept custom system integration in order to ensure the security of their robotic systems.

Collaborative & Mobile Robots Need to Interface with the Workforce

Perhaps just as important as the quality of the robots and automation system you implement is the quality of the human-machine interfacing. The people running your facility need to understand how to interact with robots, especially when dealing with collaborative and mobile robots.

Truly implementing robotic automation isn’t about replacing human labor, but streamlining operations and allowing human capital the space they need to perform more critical tasks, avoiding repetitive and/or dangerous ones.

E Tech Group automation engineers involve our clients’ key players at every step of the process, whether it’s an end-to-end project or replacing one piece of obsolete equipment with robotic automation. Mass retraining on how to interact with or alongside robots, as well as the integrated control system, allows clients to best utilize this cutting-edge technology, improving their operations in the process.

E Tech Group: Innovative, Disruptive Automation System Integration for Robotics

As the field of industrial robotics progresses and proliferates, manufacturers need control system solutions that make the most of this state-of-the art automation technology. Robotics automation companies need to be just as adaptable as the equipment they’re automating, with reliable control system design that allows for scale while adhering to strict industry standards.

E Tech Group is one of the largest control system integrators in North America, offering robotics automation services to a diverse group of industrial clients who want to expand their capabilities while remaining flexible for inevitable developments in automation technology. Our robotics clients can expect intuitive control system design, cybersafe integrated automation systems, training, and ongoing system support.

Plan for the future of your manufacturing enterprise by planning for the future of industrial robotics.